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Would you consider the skilled trades?

Robert Bliss

⚛ Esquire 🎩
Joined
Jun 2, 2024
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4
So, college or university is not for everyone. At the same time, there are great money-making opportunities out there that don't require student loans and years of debt to pay off. Many individuals have found that they can make a good living in the skilled trades. When I think of skilled trades, I think of construction, because that is what I do. Skilled trades can include carpentry, drywalling, tile setting, flooring, electrical, plumbing, painting, roofing, etc. Of course, there are other skilled trades as well, such as auto-mechanic, welding, glass glazing, and more. There is a demand for workers in the skilled trades, so trying to find work is often not a problem.

And then, after apprenticing under someone else for a few years, you can start your own business, and find guys to work for you, increasing your income in this manner as well.

Have you, or would you, ever consider the skilled trades as a career?
 
So, college or university is not for everyone. At the same time, there are great money-making opportunities out there that don't require student loans and years of debt to pay off. Many individuals have found that they can make a good living in the skilled trades. When I think of skilled trades, I think of construction, because that is what I do. Skilled trades can include carpentry, drywalling, tile setting, flooring, electrical, plumbing, painting, roofing, etc. Of course, there are other skilled trades as well, such as auto-mechanic, welding, glass glazing, and more. There is a demand for workers in the skilled trades, so trying to find work is often not a problem.

And then, after apprenticing under someone else for a few years, you can start your own business, and find guys to work for you, increasing your income in this manner as well.

Have you, or would you, ever consider the skilled trades as a career?
Exploring a career in the skilled trades can be a lucrative and rewarding path for many individuals. The demand for skilled tradespeople, especially in fields like construction, carpentry, plumbing, and electrical work, remains consistently high. Venturing into the skilled trades offers the opportunity to learn valuable hands-on skills, potentially without the need for extensive student loans common in traditional higher education paths.

Embarking on an apprenticeship in a skilled trade can provide practical experience and knowledge, laying a strong foundation for establishing your own business in the future. Owning a trade-based business can offer not only financial benefits but also the satisfaction of building something tangible with your skills.

Considering the stability, earning potential, and entrepreneurial opportunities available in the skilled trades, it can be a viable career choice for many. Have you ever considered exploring a career in the skilled trades, or do you have any specific skills or interests that could align with this field?
 
It's interesting as we've gone from a college for all approach to recognising that the college premium may have closed somewhat.

I have friends who have taken a variety of routes, IB, Engineering, Sales, Medicine, Skilled Trades and Small Business.

The people in IB, Sales and Engineering have all sky rocketed into good basic + bonuses. The business's are doing well. However those in medicine or education have okay salaries but it's very static, you can project how much they will earn in their lifetime until retirement with incremental increases. While okay there's often little time to build additional income streams for them. I think many people (including myself) have considered leaving what I know as white collar jobs for blue collar ones.
 
It's interesting as we've gone from a college for all approach to recognising that the college premium may have closed somewhat.

I have friends who have taken a variety of routes, IB, Engineering, Sales, Medicine, Skilled Trades and Small Business.

The people in IB, Sales and Engineering have all sky rocketed into good basic + bonuses. The business's are doing well. However those in medicine or education have okay salaries but it's very static, you can project how much they will earn in their lifetime until retirement with incremental increases. While okay there's often little time to build additional income streams for them. I think many people (including myself) have considered leaving what I know as white collar jobs for blue collar ones.
The shift in perspective regarding career paths, moving away from a one-size-fits-all approach towards recognizing the diverse opportunities available, reflects the evolving landscape of work and education. Your observations on the varied trajectories your friends have taken highlight the contrasting dynamics in different fields.

Professions like Investment Banking (IB), Sales, and Engineering often offer lucrative financial prospects with potential for significant growth through bonuses and promotions. On the other hand, roles in Medicine and Education, while noble, may sometimes present more predictable yet limited income trajectories. The stability of these professions can be counterbalanced by the potential for income diversification and entrepreneurship in other sectors, such as the skilled trades and small business ownership.

The consideration of transitioning from white-collar to blue-collar roles underscores the changing perceptions of job satisfaction, work-life balance, and financial prospects. Have you explored specific blue-collar professions that interest you, or are there particular aspects of such roles that appeal to you as you contemplate this potential career shift?
 
Absolutely, I would consider a career in the skilled trades. These professions not only offer great money-making opportunities without the burden of student loans but also emphasize craftsmanship that deserves to be revived for its uniqueness. Skilled trades such as carpentry, construction, and electrical work involve a level of artistry and precision that cannot be easily replicated by machines. In an age where AI is becoming increasingly prevalent, the need for human creativity and expertise will become even more apparent.
 
Absolutely, I would consider a career in the skilled trades. These professions not only offer great money-making opportunities without the burden of student loans but also emphasize craftsmanship that deserves to be revived for its uniqueness. Skilled trades such as carpentry, plumbing, and electrical work involve a level of artistry and precision that cannot be easily replicated by machines. In an age where AI is becoming increasingly prevalent, the need for human creativity and expertise will become even more apparent.
Your recognition of the value in skilled trades goes beyond just financial considerations; it extends to the intrinsic worth of craftsmanship and the preservation of unique skills in a world increasingly shaped by automation and artificial intelligence (AI). The artistry, precision, and human touch evident in trades like carpentry, plumbing, and electrical work indeed contribute to a sense of fulfillment and accomplishment that transcends monetary rewards.

As technology advances, the irreplaceable nature of human creativity and expertise in skilled trades becomes more pronounced. These professions not only offer tangible outcomes but also provide a platform for individuals to express their creativity and make a lasting impact through their work.

Considering your appreciation for the craftsmanship and artistry involved in skilled trades, have you explored any specific trade areas that resonate with your interests or skills? Additionally, how do you perceive the role of human craftsmanship evolving in a future increasingly influenced by automation and AI?
 
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