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Was your degree useful in finding a job?

Missy-KatBcat

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Joined
Jan 12, 2019
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11
How many of you kept your degree and actually got a job with it. I am a Music Major and many of my colleagues have changed their profession because they couldn't find a job with their degree.
 
I was only able to work with my degree the first two years after I graduated. Other jobs were just regular jobs. Hopefully I find something better soon.
 
For graduation, I did a Bachelors in Engineering in Electronics and now I used many electronic devices smartly. Does that count? :D
 
Very few people are able to get a job relevant to their degree after they graduate as most of the companies require a certain period of experience in that field. The best thing to do is to pursue what you like. In this way an individual will feel satisfied that they have learnt something what they desired and can turn that skill into a profession.Degree is just a recognition to show people that you have qualified for their criteria to work in the open world market. If you look into the history , most of the famous people did not had a degree and they perused what they dreamed of and were awarded with great rewards.
 
I had an engineering degree. I did not pursue engineering. It was useful in the sense that, Hey, this job needs a college graduate! Do you have a degree? but I ended up not going into the engineering profession at all. Getting away from engineering turned out to be a good decision on my part because I already knew by my second year of college that I had made a mistake in choosing that engineering degree. (I actually wanted to pursue IT, but my mother talked me out of it.) Once I got an IT job offer right out of college, I said goodbye to engineering forever.
 
I graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Accounting but I am no longer using my degree for a living because I chose a different path. I chose to be self-employed and a freelancer. I am enjoying my time more now than when I was employed working in an office 10 hours or more a day.
 
My degree is in Fine Arts and it has been of no use whatsoever in finding work. It's not like I expected it to be, I don't think many pursue a Fine Arts degree with a view to steady employment after graduation, we pursue Fine Arts because we are passionate about art and want to create.

I teach ESL with a certificate that took me two months to attain, I work with developmentally delayed/impaired adults in the community and technically one is supposed to have a degree to hold that job but I have been doing it since the 1980s when no degree was needed and I was "grandfathered" in to my current position based on my past experience and contributions. I do some art therapy but that is a volunteer position so no degree is needed. I have worked as a curator and art gallery director but also no degree was necessary... my predecessor where I last performed that function had not even graduated high school.

I suppose if I wanted to work for the government my degree would get me hired, but my government only requires their employees have a BA and they do not care what subject... I'm still not sure why they do that, but anyway... I would rather be unemployed than work for my government... ugh!

So, in short; my Fine Arts degree has not done me a lick of good in securing a job. Would I pursue something else if I had the chance? No, my education was fun and has enriched my life and I regret nothing.
 
To be honest, no. It just help us find a job in the future. (and I do not mean to say that callously). Lets look at what exactly is a job first. To keep companies/organizations/governments running, work needs to get done. And this work usually requires people to do it. If you either have experience in the kind of work that is required or have the basic education that indicates you might be able to do this kind of work then you will get the job. But once you do get it, people do not care about the fact that you have a "bachelor's degree". What people care about is whether you can do the job you are supposed to.

A bachelors degree will land you a lot more interviews than having no degree at all. A marketable bachelors degree will get you a better job (but keeping that job depends on the explanation provided in the previous paragraph). If you worked hard learning about art history or English literature in college, that is great but not immediately useful for a lot of employers. If you instead studied computer engineering, that could be pretty useful. The world does not owe you (or anybody else) a job. It is a competition where the people who work the hardest and figure out what employers need who will get a job.
 
To be honest, no. It just help us find a job in the future. (and I do not mean to say that callously). Lets look at what exactly is a job first. To keep companies/organizations/governments running, work needs to get done. And this work usually requires people to do it. If you either have experience in the kind of work that is required or have the basic education that indicates you might be able to do this kind of work then you will get the job. But once you do get it, people do not care about the fact that you have a "bachelor's degree". What people care about is whether you can do the job you are supposed to.

A bachelors degree will land you a lot more interviews than having no degree at all. A marketable bachelors degree will get you a better job (but keeping that job depends on the explanation provided in the previous paragraph). If you worked hard learning about art history or English literature in college, that is great but not immediately useful for a lot of employers. If you instead studied computer engineering, that could be pretty useful. The world does not owe you (or anybody else) a job. It is a competition where the people who work the hardest and figure out what employers need who will get a job.

It is true, many employers ask for a degree, any degree will do, and I do realize it is because they want candidates who are organized, mature, and responsible enough to be able to complete a college or university education, at least to the Bachelor's level. Makes sense. Still, I know plenty of very capable, highly intelligent, mature and responsible people with very little education. A lot of these people are smarter than many college graduates I encounter, often much smarter. They educated themselves after all. You don't see that sort of resourcefulness in your average institutionalized college graduate very often. Really, I am an advocate for alternative education models, so I tend to gravitate towards auto-didacts and unconventionally educated persons. There are many out there. And please don't take this to mean I am against institutional education. I just believe there should be some way to accredit learning gained via other models. (they actually do grant credit in fine art programs for certain types of non-institutional learning, say; you apprenticed with a sculptor for several years... it is marked as "achievement" and you gain credit towards your diploma)

but yes, a degree is helpful in gaining employment, but not really a guarantee of quality employees.
 
You don't go to school for nothing. Taking courses or degree related to what you really like will help you land a job best for you. If you stick on a degree you really love, then I'm pretty sure you will land on a job which is suitable for you and make good on it. Your earning money at the same time your enjoying because it's your passion. ❤️
 
It is quite true that people with a degree are quite organized, but it doesn't mean if you have a degree then you are assured of get a job, but the truth is that as long as you did a course or a degree program you like then it doesn't become hard.
 
Yes. Technology is rapidly evolving so a lot of company need Information Technologists especially programmers and web developers. Many clients needed people who are good at developing their ideal application into reality. And I am grateful that I study programming and living on this technological era.
 
No, not at all. I ended up working doing freelancing which is way more profitable than an actual minimum wage around here.
 
Not at all. I primarily do investments online, even though I'm a journalist by my degree. My husband does the main work and provices the income at most, but he doesn't need his degree also.
 
In my perspective, it a yes. Company nowadays looking at their resume if you are a 4 years graduate or a vocational (2 years graduate) but there are also companies who are looking for your experience eventhough you are a vocational or a degree holder. Base on my own experience vocational graduate can also accomplished what degree holder can.
 
Was your degree usedul in finding a job: In everyone the first step is the really hard one like a fresh graduate one the only thing you can present to your employee is your degree and no expereiences other than the On the Job Trainings. For me it was a big help in competing to have a job but not assurance that because of your degree you can find a job that related to your degree.
 
My degree helped me a lot. First of all in my country you can't teach unless you have a university degree, so for me in order to work as a teacher I first had to finish university and obtain my diploma. Afterwards, I enrolled and finished post graduate studies, which was not mandatory but it gives you even bigger freedom of choice when it comes to choosing and getting a new job. I think that it is very important to invest in your education and upgrade yourself academically. Work on yourself constantly.
 
Very much.I studied education and found my first job as a teacher.I'm satisfied. It has also helped me get online jobs.
 
I'm a college degree holder, but it took me almost 2 years to have a decent job. But guess what, I ended up working with machines, electronics and pneumatic. Although there are computers on our company that I can work with, I would have wanted to work for companies like Intel or AMD
 
It's true that a college degree tucked under your belt gives you a certain edge when it comes to employers seeking to fill their workforce, it's one of the main requirements in most cases but it does not guarantee a job you applied for or were hoping to get. I've been working long enough to know that much. I'm a business major so I can easily switch from one industry to another and over the years I had colleagues such as nurses, engineers, teachers and so on - people with specialized skills working for banking, advertising and travel retail sectors, filling positions irrelevant from their chosen degrees. There were also non-degree holders but good workers nonetheless.

When you're young and idealistic, you wait for that dream job to magically fall on your lap until the bills start piling up. You are then forced to get the first job that comes your way until somewhere along the road, you stop and think, "This is not working for me anymore, I quit." How many people out there do you think love their jobs?

More often than not, we are dictated by society when we should be placing more value on knowing what we want and how to get there. So don't stress yourself, continue to hone skills and polish your work ethics, you'll get there soon enough. With or without a college degree.
 
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